Saturday, 12 March 2011

Dulse

Dulse, Palmaria palmate

By Doug Frizzle March 2011

a red edible seaweed that has commercial value predominantly around the Bay of Fundy and specifically Grand Manan Island on the New Brunswick coast of Canada. (The Bay of Fundy has the largest tides in the world.)

It has been said and often repeated that Salt is not good for us. That is to say NaCl, may not be good for us but sea salts are composed of a number of assorted elements that are required by the body. Iodine has been recommended for the thyroid, for reducing cancer risk and burning away excess calories. Calcium is good for bones.

The cure for anything is salt water—sweat, tears, or the sea. —Isak Dinesen

Dulse is just one of about a hundred different edible seaweeds. In Japan annual per capita consumption is about 259g. Consumption is so high there that seaweed is farmed.

In Canada seaweeds are eaten rarely, mostly by Maritimers around the Bay of Fundy. Historically the Indians presented it to the new settlers as a cure or preventative for scurvy.

Growing up, because our family had it's roots back in Nova Scotia, we all ate Dulse on those to infrequent times when someone arrived from home. They always brought back some Dulse, as a treat. When Dad retired from the RCAF, we went back to Nova Scotia and eventually I settled there and began a family. I do recall that the first solid food that my son ate, was Dulse. Still both my children enjoy a treat of Dulse. If you have never tried it, be warned, I have found that very few people can be introduced to Dulse and find it favourable from the start -it's an acquired taste, I guess.


Dulse Links

Wikipedia on Dulse

Herb & Supplement Encyclopedia: Dulse

http://www.elements.nb.ca/theme/ethnobotany/dulse/dulse.htm

http://www.grandmanannb.com/dulse.htm

http://www.rolandsdulse.com/seaweed.html

http://www.organicdulse.com/


Recommended Reading

Salted by Mark Bitteman

Vegetables from the Sea by Seibin and Teruko Arasaki


Elemental and Vitamin Contents of Dulse

Element

Percentage

Dietary amounts

Protein

25.3

21.5g/100g

Carbohydrate

44.2

44.6g/100g

Fat

3.8

1.7g/100g

Calories


264/100g

Mineral salts

26.7


Sodium

0.47

1740mg/100g

Potassium

7.11

7820mg/100g

Calcium

2.5

213mg/100g

Iodine

0.008

5.2mg/100g

Iron

0.15

33.1mg/100g

Magnesium

0.22

271mg/100g

Copper

0.026

0.376mg/100g

Zinc

0.0041

2.86mg/100g

Nickel

0.0072


Cobalt

0.000013


Fluorine

0.0015

5.3mg/100g

Manganese


1.14mg/100g

Molybdenum

0.000031


Silica

0.6


Chromium

Trace

0.150mg/100g

Strontium, Vanadium, Titanium

Trace


Vitamin A


663 I.U.

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)


0.073mg/100g

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)


1.91mg/100g

Vitamin B3(Niacin)


1.89mg/100g

Vitamin B6 (Pyrodoxine)


8.99mg/100g

Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin)


6.60mcg/100g

Vitamin C


6.34mg/100g

Vitamin E


1.71 I.U.

g = grams, mg = milligrams, mcg = micrograms, I.U. = International Units

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As an armed forces brat, we lived in Rockcliff (Ottawa), Namao (Edmonton), Southport (Portage La Prairie), Manitoba, and Dad retired to St. Margaret's Bay, NS.
Working with the Federal Govenment for 25 years, Canadian Hydrographic Service, mostly. Now married to Gail Kelly, with two grown children, Luke and Denyse. Retired to my woodlot at Stillwater Lake, NS, on the rainy days I study the life and work of A. Hyatt Verrill 1871-1954.